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Winter Musts: Make This Scallop and Chicken Soup

Articles

Winter Musts: Make This Scallop and Chicken Soup

Kate Missine

A steaming bowl of soup warms the body and nurtures the spirit during the coldest of winter days.

 
 

The ancient Chinese people used to say, “One will find chicken and shrimp to be tasteless for three days after eating scallops.” Succulent yet firm, the delicate scallop flesh lends itself beautifully to stewing in soup. Steamed with chicken, conch meat, and Asian mushrooms, this comforting broth gets an added flavor kick with ginger, radish, and goji berries. The aromatic dish makes a perfect wintry meal, sustaining the stomach and spleen through cold temperatures, nourishing the kidney, and balancing the yin in the body.

Ingredients (serves 4):

300g white radish 
300g boneless chicken thighs
200g conch meat
4 slices of ginger
4 Asian mushrooms such as shiitakes
4 scallops
20 goji berries
Salt

Directions:

1. Cover the Asian mushrooms and scallops with water and let soak for 20 minutes. Reserve water to use in the soup later on.

2. Cut the chicken thighs into small pieces and rinse. Add the chicken to boiling water and boil for thirty seconds on high heat. Drain, and rinse the meat with clean water.

3. Divide all ingredients (add only a pinch of salt at this stage) between four single-serving stew pots (400ml each). Fill each pot nearly to the top with water, cover, and steam in a steamer pot for two hours. Add salt to taste. 

Tips:

Alternatively, simmer all four portions in one large pot. Plastic wrap can be used to seal the stew pots if lids are not available. Make sure to add salt at the very end to avoid drying out the meat.

Photography by Hsuyi Shih